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Respect | Spiritual

Irie Magazine presents Spiritual

Spiritual

Stand Up To Rasta

SPIRITUAL’s faith has destined him to this world with a mission to spread the message of Jah through the gift of his music.

Motivated by his faith and freedom of expression, he brings authentic warmth in his delivery of true Roots Reggae Rock culture to the world with love, honor and intensity for this generation.

Spiritual has adapted the traditional Roots Reggae elements (forceful drum and bass lines, raw Jamaican culture overlaid with rock elements) in creating songs such as ‘My World’, ‘Marathon’ featuring Italian Reggae Star Alborosie and now ‘Stand Up To Rasta’.

Hailing from Kingston, Jamaica, Spiritual showed his affection for music at an early age. He started singing in his church choir and studied with a focus on Poetry and Journalism. Due to Spiritual’s commitment and awareness of social consciousness, he has collaborated with reggae music producers and performers including Michael Rose, Alborosie, Bobby Digital and Sly & Robbie.

‘Spiritual’ is my name. A name that contrary to what is normal, was not chosen by me but throughout performing my life’s duties, individuals had seen it fit to regard me in this manner. I accepted it.

The Interview

IRIE. You were born in Kingston, Jamaica. Tell us a little bit about your childhood? Who were you listening to as a youth?

Spiritual: Well yes I was born in Kingston, Jamaica.  I didn’t grow up with a mother or a father, I grew up with a guardian. I loved music from when I was a child, singing on the boys choir in school and church. I would also sing on the street corner and on the streets.

I listened to artistes such as Johnny Cash, Barry White, Bob Marley, Ray Charles, Culture, Gregory Isaac, Garnett Silk and Dennis Brown.

IRIE. You began your musical career by singing in your church choir however your focus was in poetry and journalism. What inspired you to take this path?

Spiritual: Well Human Psychology took a hold on me, it makes me write a lot. I would write about everything that was of interest to me, lots of poems, songs and speeches. Everyday it was always something else, I took my church experience along with my street experience and put them together to become an inspiration to anyone who wanted to be inspired. That pushed me to get where I am and also made it easier to talk to Jah people.


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